#Shamanism Wish List

Ollantaytambo, Peru

I want to live in a society that rewards people for being good to the water, air, land and animals and people.

I want to live in a society where equal rights for all is rewarded, and shaming or ostracizing others is criminal behavior.  

I want to live in a society where people frequently talk about the other realities that shamans experience.  For example:  What do you see in the Ukhupacha (lower world), Kaypacha (middle world), Hananpacha (upper world)?  How do I know which is which?  What does this mean?  Who is helping right now so I can thank them?

I would like to live in a world where shamanism is respected very deeply–perhaps because it’s tens of thousands of years old and is effective when done properly.  

I would like to live in a world that has respected and researched standards for shamanism so that everyone has the right teacher and learning program for them.  

I would like to live in a society where I am financially and socially rewarded for all the unseen, energetic, shamanic or esoteric hurdles I’ve had to overcome since I was born.  

I’d also like to live in a society that has other people like me who have overcome a great deal and who are positive and healthy.  Perhaps we can all learn from each other.

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A Native Wisdom Sampler: World #IndigenousDay

Indigenous Worldviews-August 2015

In honor of World Indigenous Peoples Day, here is a sampler of indigenous wisdom teachings from the Q’ero (Peru) and Onandaga (NY).  Click above to enjoy more videos and quotes in magazine format.

Ayni is a Quechua word meaning reciprocity. Ayni permeates daily life among the indigenous people of the Andes Mountains as it is not just a sustainability principle but is also practiced in despacho (offering) ceremonies to the Apus (mountain spirits), Awkikuna (nature spirits) and Pachamama. To learn more about Ayni, watch this video from Dr. J.E. Williams at Ayniglobal.

Seven Generations Principle  Native North Americans honor the sacredness of all life through the seven generations principle.  “Seven generations ago somebody was looking out for me and that’s why I am here. Seven generations from now, I hope, there is somebody there.”-Oren Lyons of the Onondaga Nation

 

Let’s Envision an Indigenous World Travel Market #IndigenousDay

Ayniwasi Table

I appreciated listening to the views of Ron Mader and Ethan Gelber discussing media coverage of indigenous tourism.  It’s exciting that Planeta.com hosts many indigenous tourism events online.  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a travel market exclusively dedicated to Indigenous Tourism both online and on the ground, so that the conversation would be global?   One advantage of an online/brick and mortar indigenous travel market is the abundant media coverage.  As we prepare to celebrate World Indigenous Day, let’s envision a world indigenous travel market.

Book Review: Light of the Andes by Dr. J.E. Williams

Mountain at Machu Picchu

Ever since I came back from my trip to Peru, I’ve been looking forward to the release of Light of the Andes by Dr. J.E. Williams.  While visiting the Andes Mountains, I felt a deeply spiritual connection to the land of Peru.  Reading Light of the Andes helped me understand and place my experiences in Peru within a broader context.   It was a feeling of being in a land that I had never visited before, yet it felt like home.

While every person experiences things differently, there may have been similarities between what I experienced and what Dr. Williams experienced upon his first trips to Peru years ago.  Perhaps it was this feeling of being home, that led him to the very special Q’ero people, and his his soul brother, Don Sebastian Pauccar Flores.  Dr. Williams has chronicled his initial encounters with Don Sebastian in his 2005 book, The Andean Codex.  Light of the Andes continues this journey with Don Sebastian to the great Andes mountain, Apu Ausangate.

While storytelling is a very effective form of communication, it is the principles interwoven within the stories that create a deeper understanding.  This is the very difficult technique that Dr. Williams employs in his writing style in both The Andean Codex and Light of the Andes.  While there are many principles within the Q’ero tradition, I was most interested in the concept of ayni (reciprocity).  In the preface to Light of the Andes, Dr. Williams writes:  “Ayni is the touchstone of the Q’ero worldview who hold it as the code of life, an innate imprint discoverable in nature and ever present in the universe where it forms the content of every thing—the matrix of all being.”

In The Andean Codex, Dr. Williams ventured into the land of the Q’ero to experience life from their perspective.  Most importantly, the relationship between Dr. Williams and Don Sebastian forms a basis for their journey.  In Light of the Andes, Don Sebastian takes his first trip to Lima, the capital of Peru, and experiences urban city life.  When I returned from my first trip to Peru, I  experienced some of the same culture shock.  Once I felt the deep spiritual connection with the Andean world, it felt very disjunct and spiritually barren when I returned to the US.  While I had missed the familiarity of modern 21st century Florida,  I instantly felt a longing to have the spiritual energy of the Andes with me as well.

Most of all, I was impressed by Dr. Williams’ profound spiritual, physical, emotional and mental preparation. His initiation process at Apu Ausangate was the result of years of dedication.  He had to integrate the Q’ero principles into his life before venturing up the mountain.   It is because of his dedication over many years to this process that we as readers have been given a gift.