Offering Smoke: Sacred Tobacco Ceremony #indigenous

 A Lakota (Sioux) chanunpa pipestem, without the pipe bowl, displayed at the United States Library of Congress

A Lakota (Sioux) chanunpa pipestem, without the pipe bowl, displayed at the United States Library of Congress, courtesy of Wikipedia.

Since I am interested in learning and sharing content about indigenous peoples, I find that many of the cultures and traditions are from around the globe.  Here in the US, it is harder to locate authentic and accurate information about indigenous people, but it is possible.

One of the ways that I connect with indigenous cultures of North America is by learning about their ceremonies, more specifically the sacred tobacco ceremony.  While searching on the internet, I found a description written by Nicholas Breeze Wood which seemed to match my understanding of the sacred tobacco ceremony.

 

 

Let’s Envision an Indigenous World Travel Market #IndigenousDay

Ayniwasi Table

I appreciated listening to the views of Ron Mader and Ethan Gelber discussing media coverage of indigenous tourism.  It’s exciting that Planeta.com hosts many indigenous tourism events online.  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a travel market exclusively dedicated to Indigenous Tourism both online and on the ground, so that the conversation would be global?   One advantage of an online/brick and mortar indigenous travel market is the abundant media coverage.  As we prepare to celebrate World Indigenous Day, let’s envision a world indigenous travel market.